Discussion:
Why only 65 episodes of children's shows?
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TMC
2013-03-30 23:54:35 UTC
Permalink
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=display&thread=469353

65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).

Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?

I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.

« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.

I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...

« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.

« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.

« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.

« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.

« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
nobody
2013-03-31 17:32:18 UTC
Permalink
For reruns:
13 weeks X 5 weekdays = 65

13 weeks is a fourth of a year, so you only need to program four titles per timeslot. If the number of episodes isn't divisible by 65, then it's less popular in syndication.
I remember reading that years ago.
Bill Steele
2013-04-01 18:12:03 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by TMC
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=display&threa
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).
Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?
I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.
« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.
I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...
« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.
« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.
« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.
« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.
« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
I believe this is a standard adopted by Disney, which is why it's not
consistent.

Just guessing, but it may be because that's all they can usually get
before kid stars grow up too far -- either getting so they don't look
like kids, or going off to college. Not a problem with animated shows.
anim8rFSK
2013-04-01 18:30:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Steele
In article
Post by TMC
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=display&thr
ea
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).
Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?
I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.
« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.
I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...
« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.
« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.
« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.
« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.
« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
I believe this is a standard adopted by Disney, which is why it's not
consistent.
Just guessing, but it may be because that's all they can usually get
before kid stars grow up too far -- either getting so they don't look
like kids, or going off to college. Not a problem with animated shows.
52 doesn't make any sense; it should be divisible by 5.
--
"Every time a Kardashian gets a TV show, an angel dies."
Remysun
2013-04-01 22:50:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rFSK
Post by Bill Steele
In article
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=disp...
ea
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).
Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?
I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.
« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.
I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...
« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.
« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.
« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.
« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.
« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
I believe this is a standard adopted by Disney, which is why it's not
consistent.
Just guessing, but it may be because that's all they can usually get
before kid stars grow up too far -- either getting so they don't look
like kids, or going off to college. Not a problem with animated shows.
52 doesn't make any sense; it should be divisible by 5.
52 is 4 times 13. That fills out the weekdays for a year quite nicely.
Ian J. Ball
2013-04-02 00:31:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Remysun
Post by anim8rFSK
Post by Bill Steele
In article
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=disp...
ea
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).
Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?
I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.
« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.
I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...
« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.
« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.
« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.
« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.
« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
I believe this is a standard adopted by Disney, which is why it's not
consistent.
Just guessing, but it may be because that's all they can usually get
before kid stars grow up too far -- either getting so they don't look
like kids, or going off to college. Not a problem with animated shows.
52 doesn't make any sense; it should be divisible by 5.
52 is 4 times 13. That fills out the weekdays for a year quite nicely.
Fred's point is correct, though - 55 would make more sense for 'back-
end' syndication (11 weeks of episodes, 5-days a week). Actually, by
this metric, 60 or 65 episodes would make the most sense...
anim8rFSK
2013-04-02 00:50:44 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by Ian J. Ball
Post by Remysun
Post by anim8rFSK
Post by Bill Steele
In article
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=disp..
.
ea
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes). It's
also where most of the shows end their run, but there are exceptions
to the rule where a show lasts more than 65 episodes (He-Man, G.I.
Joe, Transformers, TMNT, and recently, My Little Pony: FIM, which was
renewed for a fourth season).
Why do most animated/children's shows end at 65 episodes, even at the
height of a show's popularity?
I think that as long as the show can run with the big dogs, more
episodes would be produced until the writers call it a day and end the
show on their terms. OTOH, there are shows that were cancelled before
hitting the 65-episode benchmark.
« Reply #1 Today at 5:22pm »
Probably a cost thing, plus networks seem to prefer generally to not
build dynasties and instead just get a few years worth of success out
of a show then dump it and move to something else.
I can think of a lot more than that to get more than 65 episodes,
though. Phineas & Ferb is still going at over 100 in a truly shocking
but pleasantly surprising change for Disney, Kim Possible (okay, that
was cancelled at 65 episodes, but at least it came back for a fourth
season that had like three good episodes), Teen Titans, probably
Justice League Unlimited (dunno for sure, never really watched it),
Powerpuff Girls, SpongeBob...
« Reply #2 Today at 5:28pm »
There's also the "quality vs. quantity" issue, and the effects it has
on writers.
« Reply #3 Today at 5:29pm »
65 episodes is the magic number needed for syndication.
« Reply #4 Today at 5:29pm »
I'm guessing that it has to do with the animation lead time and by and
large the networks and studios have probably estimated that the lead
time to complete 65 episodes is about the max length they can take
before the audience will lose interest and move until something new.
« Reply #5 Today at 5:31pm »
I read that it was because kids care less about seeing reruns than
adults do, so there's no reason for studios to spend more to make more
episodes if it won't affect viewership and merchandise sales that
much.
« Reply #7 Today at 5:46pm »
5 times a week for 13 weeks.
I believe this is a standard adopted by Disney, which is why it's not
consistent.
Just guessing, but it may be because that's all they can usually get
before kid stars grow up too far -- either getting so they don't look
like kids, or going off to college. Not a problem with animated shows.
52 doesn't make any sense; it should be divisible by 5.
52 is 4 times 13. That fills out the weekdays for a year quite nicely.
Fred's point is correct, though - 55 would make more sense for 'back-
end' syndication (11 weeks of episodes, 5-days a week). Actually, by
this metric, 60 or 65 episodes would make the most sense...
Yeah. Who strips shows at a rate of one a week?
--
"Every time a Kardashian gets a TV show, an angel dies."
Obveeus
2013-04-02 04:41:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian J. Ball
Post by Remysun
Post by anim8rFSK
http://officialfan.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=offtopic&action=disp...
ea
d=469353
65 half-hour episodes are traditionally required for most children's
shows to reach syndication (I believe that it's now 52 episodes).
52 doesn't make any sense; it should be divisible by 5.
52 is 4 times 13. That fills out the weekdays for a year quite nicely.
Fred's point is correct, though - 55 would make more sense for 'back-
end' syndication (11 weeks of episodes, 5-days a week). Actually, by
this metric, 60 or 65 episodes would make the most sense...
65 = 5 x 13 which makes perfect sense for a quarter of TV programming. I
think the upthread point about 52 episodes might in some way be linked to 4
x 13 = 52...which is the same quarter of programming, but assumes that the
channel will be airing something else on Friday nights? Or maybe just the
idea that these channels only air a new episode of something on Friday so
they will need only 13 episodes per quarter 4 quarters a year is 52 episodes
(though that seems silly since the stuff that airs new only on Fridays
usually only airs a smattering of new episodes a year, not one every single
Friday).

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