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Petition | Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, & Disney Channel: Have corrupt executives undo their work & permanently resign.
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2013-09-11 09:08:13 UTC
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http://www.change.org/petitions/cartoon-network-nickelodeon-disney-channel-have-corrupt-executives-undo-their-work-permanently-resign

This is part of our plan to save Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Disney Channel for future generations. People might say they like the new programs due to its relative quality, but they are being deprived of true quality animation. This is also a plan to preserve the state of quality on these networks to their highest points, only allowing them to improve.

This movement is often mistaken for “bringing the 90’s shows back into production and cancelling all of the current running shows.” That is not what we intend to do, albeit we are heavily influenced by the significant quality of 90’s programming. Without the presence of more reruns on the main networks, the audience and the executives both forget what brought the 90’s shows its fame and identity; high standards of qualities while coinciding with the pop culture at the time to a reasonable amount. This is why people can go back to shows of earlier generations and still find programs mostly amusing. Nowadays, television shows are so obsessed with being a part of pop culture that they forget to include the quality that makes a program memorable in the first place. Our explanation is long, but paramount to read in order to understand. I will also explain the change in quality over the years, and how these facts are separated from our own individual interpretations. Before reading this, understand that these are not our opinions, but the history of children’s television for the last 15 years. Any statement said is the cold hard truth and should not be understood as “hate.”

As mentioned before, the current competing networks too often focus on competition, and forget “quality over quantity.” It is this notion that makes networks abandon their roots, especially ones that had brought them fame and success that they had rightfully deserved. While many modern shows are supposedly successful on Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Disney Channel, they did not achieve that success through the quality of their programming. Often times, the gap between the successful and unsuccessful shows is too great, not unlike the gap between the rich and the poor social classes. In addition, the fans who remained faithful to these networks were often hypnotized into blindly supporting a certain show, a term of which I will explain later called a fantard. One final concept I will expand upon is the use of copying methods from other networks, including ones that do not specialize in children’s programming.

This decline began over several steps, primarily with Cartoon Network’s programming. Parents of that generation, often the stereotypical “soccer mom” or “control freak parents,” had blamed the shows of the last generation for anything that they did not like about their children. Although many of these shows had admirable, moral role models, in addition to other, less intelligent characters of whom the creators wanted to ensure would not be desired to be imitated, those parents, who were blinded by unawareness, believed that having those shows cancelled would fix this supposed problem. They also complained about inappropriate sexual humor and violence; however, the incognito humor of most 90’s programming was hidden well enough to pass over the minds of little children, and the violent shows had a more mature rating. It was the parents’ responsibilities to attempt to understand the mindset of their children, as well as prevent them from watching violent programming. The latter was the reason the programming block Toonami was moved from weekdays to Saturday nights in April 2004. Yet these parents were still unsatisfied. They wanted to remove any and all violence from these networks, instead of facing their fears and teaching children to be better than what they see on television. It is the very reason more mature shows on these networks have a warning that states “parental guidance is suggested/viewer discretion is advised.” Yet these adults also prevented their kids from watching the shows that were actually appropriate for their age group, and only because of certain references they would not even understand until they were older. While many worse intimations permeate the current programming of these networks, they are unseen by those same types of parents, despite the fact that it was what they were hoping television shows would avoid. This controversy has been spread throughout all three networks, but especially Nickelodeon. Most of the original Cartoon Cartoons stopped airing for a different reason, but many Nicktoons were known for secretly pushing the censors in adult jokes. One of the most notable in their programming, despite being live-action, was Britney Spears's performance at the 1999 Kids Choice Awards, which she made apparent she was not wearing a bra under her clothes.

Meanwhile, a decline in Nickelodeon’s programming began towards the second half of the last decade. Cyma Zarghami is particularly noted for this; she became the president of children’s programming at Viacom in 2006, which is explained to have been the beginning of the network’s downfall. She obsesses over the happiness over females and appears to focus solely on that aspect of her career. She began a change known as the MTV effect; this involved changing the programming on Nickelodeon and its blocks, while dramatically altering the actual programming of MTV. Subsequently, this resulted in a few changes; firstly, it caused all of the Nickelodeon blocks to ultimately become individual channels (except for ***@Nite); secondly, it changed the type of programming from individually unique, innovative cartoons, Nickcoms, and game shows, to cash cows, “Shitcoms” that revolve around inaccurately portrayed teenage life, music, or the internet, and programming that will often be unloved and either cancelled or discarded to a sister network; thirdly, she wanted the complete abandonment of the splat logo, because "We wanted to clean it up and allow Nick to be the stamp on all of these channels," and"In asking ourselves if everything could live under the splat, we decided that the splat was dated," she said. "It just couldn't be done in a streamlined way." Except Cyma Zargahmi fails to understand the symbolism of the splat logo. Over the years of the splat logo’s use, there have been many variations of the same logo, varying in shape and incarnation among Nickelodeon, its sister networks, and its programming. The significance of the splat logo is that it did not have to always use the iconic splat. The unique design allowed it to become virtually anything, and it symbolized a wide diversity of programming able to uniquely diversity yet stay united under a common name. This is why the splat logo of Nickelodeon is so iconic and memorable. Yet under the MTV effect, which forced more musical-based media in Nickelodeon, the network slowly began to lose its variety of programming. Nickelodeon’s Cash Cows, such as Spongebob Squarepants, The Fairly Odd Parents, ICarly, Victorious, Degrassi, and Dora the Explorer all began to be focused on more, while other shows were either cancelled or reduced in reruns.

To diminish the demographic-oriented blocks and the sister networks, they merged the two; while The N and Noggin were relatable to TEENick and Nick Jr. respectively, they sister networks were not meant to fall under the same name due to their dramatically differing programming. Nicktoons Network also fell under this category, although it was mistakenly associated with Nickelodeon due to its splat logo and reruns of older Nick programming. Cyma Zargahmi began to move the blocks that were on Nickelodeon to the sister networks; although the programming remained on the main channel, the Nicktoons and TEENick blocks were discontinued so she could rebrand all four networks in fall 2009. She forced these networks under one common appearance to encourage conformity, as well as have the cash cows infect the other networks, in addition to the already-existing cash cows air more often.

Cyma doesn’t realize that if she had not altered the demographics for the main and sister networks, there would not be a need for rebranding Nickelodeon. In fact, ICarly, Victorious, and even Dora the Explorer became Cash Cows under her command, and due to her obsession of girl power. “I think for all kids, but for girls in particular, that the opportunities presented to them and the people around them are critically important to their success, particularly as tweens.” Not only does this give an intimation of being sexist, but she is also completely ignorant to positive influences. In fact, her cash cows actually destroyed opportunities in a sense, and made tweens think they had to be more like what they were seeing more often on TV.

“Girls today need to have a great opinion of themselves, no matter what, they need to have confidence in what they want to do, and they need to have confidence in what they don’t know yet.” Which is like saying Adolf Hitler should be proud for killing 8 million Jews, whether he knew or not, or even considered, who or how he might be hurting others. This blind confidence boosts the ignorance to “justify” the expansion of the cash cows, and would ultimately give other networks an alleged justification for creating cash cows themselves. “And they need to be able to ask a lot of questions, and they need people to be able to ask those questions of. Girls need great role models, girls need opportunities, and they need to be inspired along every step of the way to do great things.” On the contrary, Nickelodeon’s leading female role models, Miranda Cosgrove and Victoria Justice, play the roles of ignorant teenagers who only find happiness through fame or musical talent, and often make irrational decisions without any parental consent or guidance. In fact, Victoria Justice has been seen wearing more revealing clothing than most women in adult films. “I think the more that girls are encouraged to do anything and everything that boys are able to do is also a great thing.” In other words, she is attempting reverse sexism. It can be conjectured that her prejudice towards males in Nickelodeon programming may have something to do with her Iranian Heritage, more specifically the heavy Muslim influence in that area. Additionally, religion plays a minor role in networking, although more in Disney Channel than any of the three mainstream networks at the time. It is important to remember that Nickelodeon is iconic because it had a great representation of kids’ interests and desires, while giving important life lessons in their shows so kids could truly learn what is good for them and others. Modern Nickelodeon is deliberately dramatically different from the old network because Cyma wants to throw away true fan representation in favor of appeasing adults. Mainstream media is purposely forcing cash cows and conformity down everyone’s throats, and it is important to have morality behind television production.

Disney copied the MTV effect as well, with even more unrealistic aspects of life, particularly in High School, with Disney's hidden, twisted racism becoming more present; this started movies like High School Musical. From then on, all of their showed involve some sort of romance-oriented musical, and every primary Disney celebrity was required to be a singer (as well as every singer being an actor, as portrayed by the series, “Jonas”). In addition, Disney showed more of their racism by substituting Black people with Indians, and Jewish people with Asians. Newer programs have also proven to be constantly unoriginal and make religious references. In fact, the only reason Isabella Garcia-Sheppiro from Phineas and Ferb was chosen to be Jewish was so she could disprove her own faith in their Christmas Special (hence the reason she brings up her faith at that point in the show). Yet at the same time that Disney appears to be against Judaism, they are run by Jewish individuals that have aspersed the German population through stereotypes, likely as a result of the horrors of the Holocaust. Most notable examples include “the antagonist[s] in some of their kids shows…implied to be German or of Germanic decent…The EVIL Dr."Doofenshmirtz" is from "Drooslestien" and is the antagonist of Phineas And Ferb…in the show they show him with a racist backstory with much and overly dramatized German stereotypes, Lederhosen, thick Germanic accents (Which is actually mentioned by Mr. Fletcher in the series) as well as other things. In American Dragon Jake Long, Professor Rotwood, ALSO the show's antagonist is very shrill and is trying to expose Jake as a dragon. He also has a similar backstory which it goes into with stereotypes in one episode which I believe the name of the episode is "Dreamscape", as well as the fact he uses Germanic phrases (He also speaks with a thick accent) such as "Schnell!" or "Nein!” In addition, the original Suite Life of Zack and Cody; the antagonist of the Hotel Tipton is a German woman (who also has a thick accent and ludicrously loud obnoxious tone)” (Towerpreracademy).

While a handful of decent cartoons were created during this time, they all suffered the same fate of cancellation (some of which were prematurely cancelled) due to the rising cash cows. In fact, many of the newer animated programs, both of high and low-quality, were simply produced by Disney and the creators had no prior work experience with Disney. Unlike Nickelodeon however, Disney Channel focused on making their live-action cash cows become fangirl obsessions and teen idols. This is the reason that Disney’s 65-episode rule was created in the late 2000’s, and it would only apply to shows that debuted after it took effect (hence why Phineas and Ferb is able to defy that decree). In addition, the focus on these musical-based programs caused the decadence and eventual removal of Disney’s action block, Jetix, which had kid-friendly shows and a few iconic animes (due to differences in programming and schedule generally did not compete with Toonami, despite popular belief). While live-action cash cows do not last as long as animated ones because of the actors’ continuous aging, they made more of a profit this way from unsuspecting children and adults. Disney claims to be parent-approved, but the only parents that displayed their approbation were overly-protective control freaks and soccer moms. Yet like in the censorship controversy with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, they were as naïve as their own children in the sense of subliminal messages. If adults truly cared as much as we do for the well-being of future generations, they should not let Disney, in addition to the other two mainstream children’s networks, to continue down the destructive path they are following.

Disney Channel has been teaching kids, starting with the same unsuspecting generation, to "follow your dreams." However, they also essentially force worship on the unsuspecting addicts of their shows; in other words, these people are following the dreams that Disney is forcing on them, while fooling them into believing they can actually find true happiness by appeasing the people of Disney. While it is essential to help others find happiness in order to achieve it oneself, completely disregarding one’s own happiness in order to fulfill the greedy desires of corrupt people will only make a person feel good so long as the other one accepts them simply for making them happy. That is the kind of relationship Disney has with their millions of blindly-devoted fans; none of them actually try to obtain personal happiness by their own means, but rather by solely appeasing their peers and Disney. While Disney cannot punish a defiant person directly, the social conformity encouraged by Disney Channel’s current programming will make that person suffer from their peers’ lack of tolerance.



Too often does Disney, as well as Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, want fans to use their shows as escapism. Many supporters even claim that watching those shows makes them feel good because they can escape the numerous hardships of the real world. That reasoning is basically the same mindset that drug addicts use to justify their addiction. Aside from the differences of the dangers, any type of addiction can be negative. These new programs have only encouraged the detachment more by making the unrealistic lives of fictional characters appear worth living. “The importance of quality for kids nowadays is excruciatingly important because what the 90's and early 2000's brought to television for kids and preteens made life worth living…The three brands need to make more high quality series teaching about how to correctly live….It’s infuriating to see the cartoons that taught us from the 90's and early 2000's [have] to complete [with] shit of what's on now” (David McGee). Instead of giving viewers a false sense of hope for what life can become, children’s shows should attempt to be more relatable to the viewers so they can truly reflect it on their own lives in a positive manner, and see how they can actually improve their own lives instead of always yearning for empty dreams.

For example; if a person really wanted to follow a career of becoming a singer or actor, they should constantly strive to improve. They should be concerned equally with their talent and personal enjoyment, and potential profit to a lesser degree. This is another flaw of many of not only television’s current singers, but also all of the people who perform any form of art for the three channels. Singers too often resort to Autotunes for their own talent, as well as focus on the money they will make, that they completely forget what real talent is. And this ignorance among people is what leads to the amount of scandals that Disney and Nickelodeon celebrities have been involved in.

In January 2007, Adult Swim was advertising their Aqua Teen Hunger Force Movie with LED lights of the Mooninites, scattered in 10 different cities, one of which was Boston. Some people mistook the lights for explosive devices, thus causing the 2007 Boston Bomb Scare. Jim Samples, the old President, was forced to resign, and he was replaced by Stuart Snyder, an infamous man for good reasons. Like Cyma, he planned to change the network in his own image instead of what was good for the fans.

Stuart Snyder is perhaps most known for having replaced Fridays with Fired Dynamite, and replaced Toonami with Live-action on CARTOON network, because he claimed to not like anime. He closed any and all fan input, and there is no longer any group of people working at Cartoon Network that represent the interests of true fans because of his restructured production team. This essentially parallels that of a dictator in a communist society, especially keeping the minds of those he wants to manipulate under the level of awareness which he chooses, at least in regard to the production that was going behind the future shows. The following explanation regarding Stuart Snyder and his impact is far more complicated than the MTV effect, especially since Cartoon Network generally did not focus on musical-based programming. While there were occasional celebrity endorsements, these people never intended to be associated with Cartoon Network or its programming, much like Will.i.am ever since his song “Secret Formula” for the show Dexter’s Laboratory. Even the program Class of 3000 would have never turned the network in a different direction; in fact, the unique beats and songs from Andre 3000 would have made the program iconic had the show not been cancelled due to a plagiarism lawsuit (and as far as we know, Stuart Snyder was not involved in this case).

Firstly, the cajolement of the viewers into accepting lower, if none at all, standards of quality animation. For such a reason, Cartoon Network became more heavily dependent on Canadian programming before it could install cash cows of its own. This, however, is primarily because Stuart Snyder could not make a cash cow out of the Powerpuff Girls, the longest running show on Cartoon Network at the time, after Craig McCracken turned down the offer of another season of the show. Surprisingly, McCracken’s decision was for the very prevention of his show of becoming a cash cow.

The most infamous Canadian show that does this is Johnny Test, which has nearly run even longer than any other Cartoon Network or Teletoon show in terms of episode production. Numerous others were used as well, but Johnny Test eventually became its main focus due to higher ratings. As a result, it not only replaced the decent (in terms of intended quality) Canadian shows such as 6teen and Stoked, but also took over the times and positions of nearly all other shows. In other words, Johnny Test’s success was at the expense of other shows, another tactic that made shows become cash cows. The excess profit is done by it taking over the timeslots of other programs, almost to a point of being "filler" for Cartoon Network's programming.

Stuart Snyder attempted to make cash cows out of as many genres as possible. Even though Cartoon Network’s only prime time cash cows would come from Canada for a few years, the action and anime business began to dwindle. Cartoon Network began to deliberately focus on Ben 10, although its standards of quality were not yet lowered. The purpose of Ben 10’s inflation was to get rid of nearly every anime program on Cartoon Network, and he would be able to do so by destroying the long-running and well-known action and anime block, Toonami. Ben 10 would eventually go on to become a monopoly, but it would not do so until after Stuart Snyder made sure it completed its first mission of removing Toonami from Cartoon Network. Shows that Ben 10 caused to cancel afterward include the You Are Here block, The Secret Saturdays, Generator Rex, Green Lantern, Thundercats, Young Justice, and the DC Nation Block. The majority of these revolved around merchandise and ratings, simply because they were not making as much of a relative profit to Ben 10 (but were still making sufficient success).

Although there are other reasons for Cartoon Network's current lack of anime, including the problems between Bandai America and Bandai Japan, it mainly sprouted from Snyder. When they stopped listening to the fans, they also copied several minor strategies from the MTV effect, particularly the inclusion of live-action programming on, as stated before, a channel that specializes in animated programming.

In order to expurgate all anime from Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder used the Cash Cow scheme on the most popular anime (in addition to the most beloved action series, Ben 10), Naruto. Despite popular belief, Stuart Snyder was not responsible for the TOM 4 era. Although Sean Akins and Jason DeMarco were perhaps mistaken in entirely changing the block around, Stuart Snyder wanted to make the new look and feel as infamous as possible so it would lose viewers and thus get cancelled. He did so by over-endorsing Naruto on purpose, because he knew Naruto fans were often hardcore and in great numbers. He even allowed unaired episodes of the show to be shown on the American website, to steal ratings from Toonami. As a result, like Johnny Test and Ben 10, Naruto began to cause other anime programs on the block to be removed, the most well-known of which are BoBoBo-Bo Bo-BoBo and One Piece.

For this reason, Toonami’s running time was cut down to two hours in October 2007. Naruto was still emphasized on the block due to demands of Stuart Snyder, even though the block was in desperate need of newer programming. Even so, Naruto still aired for an hour on the block, technically making up half of its programming and the majority of its ratings (the latter is partially because it has taken over other show’s places). A small sense of hope came in the middle of 2008, with shows such as Batman the Brave and the Bold, Star Wars the Clone Wars, and the Secret Saturdays approaching later that year. These shows could have theoretically saved Toonami from cancellation, and survived on American programming like it once did until their decaying budget could license new animes. But at that point, Stuart Snyder had the Toonami schedule changed again—this time, with the addition of Ben 10 Alien Force and Samurai Jack—to make Naruto the only show with premieres. This imbalance, along with Naruto’s sudden jump to a filler arc, toppled Toonami and resulted in its cancellation on September 20, 2008. Since then, none of those anime programs—along with nearly all of Toonami’s former shows—have ever aired.

The only animes that remain on Cartoon Network to this day are long-running programs such as Pokémon, which Stuart Snyder has attempted to make a cash cow as well, and pseudo-anime, which is an imitation of Japanese styles that is usually done by wither American or Korean show creators. Either way, the quality in both kinds of shows is low in America, partially due to censorship. As a result, the anime industry, which had essentially been introduced to America by Toonami, suffered a four year recession (which only began to improve by the revival of Toonami by Adult Swim) due to lack of networks willing to dub their programming and pirating that Stuart Snyder basically introduced and allowed. However, the only time Cartoon Network, or any of these three networks, will make copyright claims is when it works in their favor, such as blocking access to view older shows.

Meanwhile, the abandonment of Japanese programming brought further dependency on Canadian programming, while the interest for newer shows turned in favor of live-action programming. While there had been a few failed attempts at putting live-action on Cartoon Network, such as the movie Re-Animated and its television continuation Out of Jimmy’s Head, as well as the Fried Dynamite Block, the “Fall” era, Cartoon Network planned on adding live-action more than ever before following Toonami’s cancellation. With the Nood era, Cartoon Network was easily able to stray from its roots and make new-gen fans unaware of the network’s past, even with mention of past shows on their website, as well as the Massive Multiplayer Online Game, Fusionfall. However, the schedule of Cartoon Network to this day has either purged all former programming, or placed it in an inconvenient timeslot in which viewers will not know if or when to watch. Because of the absence of Cartoon Network’s former standards of quality animation, fans could fool themselves into thinking they were watching the epitome of quality animation, as a result of human nature to cope with life, especially if one cannot see injustice behind it. In addition, Fusionfall was a game which required a subscription, which was often difficult for fans to obtain due to the economic recession of the United States at the time. Once again, Stuart Snyder knew the effects of his decisions and chose them because of the desired effect.

The introduction of live-action permanently maimed Cartoon Network for all its years to date. Since the official introduction of live-action, including reality and game shows, the network has strayed from its initial mission of being full of primarily multiple, domestic, animated programs and foreign and acquired programming being a secondary fulfillment (and the large amount of Japanese anime was due to the success of its first priority, which remained through the years until Snyder took over). Firstly, live-action shows were used to create shows whose concepts were copied from others; among these were attempted kid-friendly versions of paranormal shows (The Othersiders), Taxi Ride (Brainrush), Survival-themed shows (Survive This), Mythbusters (Dude, What Would Happen), America’s Funniest Home Videos (Bobby says), and even Japan’s Human Tetris (Hole in the Wall).

However, the extreme purging and censorship of the past, combined with the removal of anime and all of the Cartoon Cartoons, unoriginal live-action shows on a network dedicated to cartoons, corrupt actions of Stuart Snyder, and over-airing of Canadian shows and cash cows, pushed many fans of Cartoon Network to protest. In June of 2010, Stuart Snyder was removed from power. As a result, nearly all of his damages were immediately undone, and the rest of his changes appeared to be in the process of being reversed. Reruns of quite a few Cartoon Network series began to return to the network during the day. Johnny test slowly began to dwindle since the beginning of that year, allowing 6teen and subsequently Stoked to continue airing new episodes in the US, and 6teen even had the opportunity to finish its run. Live-action was almost eliminated from Cartoon Network altogether; only two of the original reality shows remained (although had one yet to air), and the block CN Real and the live-action bumpers were dropped altogether. While the program Unnatural History was introduced and perhaps did not belong on Cartoon Network, the effort, well execution of the program, and lack of emphasis on high school life made it a mystery series with much positive potential. A new logo and era were unveiled, which was more reflective on Cartoon Network’s past; not only was the checkerboard reintroduced for the first time since the network’s first rebrand, but the “Check It” era was meant to be a redux of Cartoon Network’s first era, the checkerboard era, further emphasizing the recollection of the past while positively evolving towards the future. Fusionfall began to reach a seemingly growing greatness, especially having become free to play earlier that year, and it gave Adventure Time a proper introduction to Cartoon Network without inflating it. Ben 10 went on to an extended hiatus; with this, the cancellation of the You Are Here block (which actually resulted from Ben 10 forcing the other programs into cancellation), the introduction of Generator Rex, and Sym-Bionic Titan and a new season of Star Wars the Clone Wars on the horizon, much hope came for the return of Toonami, since the beginning of the fall would also mark the block’s two year cancellation anniversary.

But all hopes to rebuild the future in a reflection of the past—a major ideology of Cartoon Network, especially with Hanna-Barbara cartoons, was quashed by Stuart Snyder’s return to power in August 2010. Johnny Test’s airing time increased once again to exclude Stoked (which played a role of “succeeding” 6teen at the time); Stuart Snyder also began making Adventure Time into a cash cow, preventing all of the past prime time cartoons from airing on Cartoon Network anymore until newer shows, which lowered the standards of quality dramatically, debuted. Live action turned in the wrong direction again, with Unnatural History being cancelled and more focus on Dude What Would Happen and Destroy Build Destroy (the last of the original CN real shows). After Tower Prep, another live-action mystery series on Cartoon Network, was released and shortly after cancelled, Cartoon network created Hole in The Wall, the description of which has already been mentioned. He even introduced a live-action awards show, Hall of Game Awards, which has aired annually since February 2011.

Even revivals of older shows, such as a fifth season of Courage the Cowardly Dog or even a sequel to Codename Kids Next Door, were now impossible. Updates in Fusionfall became scarce, and eventually simply became the addition of nanos from the newer programming, as an attempt to endorse the cash cows. Any and all dreams of a returning Toonami dissipated with the return of Ben 10 premieres, as well as a block that began to symbolize the conformity that Stuart Snyder created upon his return to Cartoon Network. “‘Night of Action’ in no way shape or form compares to Toonami. It doesn't compare to it on a content, execution, presentation, or like-ability standpoint and it is obvious CN wants action fans who loved Toonami to come back, but they won't… unless you bring it back” (Flapperdoodle's Gaming Blog Ep. 26: Five Reasons Why Cartoon Network is NO Longer Awesome!).



Following the end of Ben 10 Alien Force’s second season, Cartoon Network hired Derrick J. Wyatt to work on the show’s art and story, as well as other programs for the network. Derrick J. Wyatt is perhaps the epitome of a fantard. He, like the urban definition of a fantard, is a “Person who obsesses over a series (TV, book, movie etc.) and acts annoyingly like it’s the best thing ever made. Most fantards…are motivated by blind loyalty...Fantards are also known to be really rude to people who go against their precious fandom and don't practice…any type of preference tolerance” (“Fantard”). Like others who are too devoted to a particular form of media, they are what essentially ruin great franchises due to their inability to see if or when the quality declines, and become the reason that a particular series is over-continued. Derrick J. Wyatt had the power to undo the corruption in Cartoon Network’s programs, especially since he was rather down-to-earth towards the fans. But at the same time, those types of whom he was close with were the same types of unhealthy addicts to media, hence his fame and success between Cartoon network and among his followers. His art style is most criticized, not necessarily for his lack of talent or original programs (both of which are still major problems nonetheless), but rather his misinterpretation of shows that he most enjoys, and consequently deforms various Cartoon Network shows, specifically shows that Turner Broadcasting both owns and has the full rights to.

Upon several complaints regarding his work, Derrick J. Wyatt claimed that those who did not appreciate his work did not know anything about animation or arts; yet at the same time, a formal education is not required to conclude that Derrick J. Wyatt on the other hand, does not know anything about quality animation or how art and animation are appropriately incorporated into it. Even when his art style suggests he knows nothing about art and animation himself, how it was used in shows he has worked on is another aspect that infuriates fans.

Even Cartoon Network’s refusal to take fan input has not hindered Derrick J. Wyatt. Even on his deviantART account, he uploads fan art of shows he has not ever worked on, once again abiding by his own interpretation of the characters more than factors that make such characters, especially in multiple incarnations of them, memorable and iconic to fans.

Perhaps the one show he worked on with his art style was actually appropriate for its franchise; Transformers Animated. The severe alteration was appropriate for the Transformers, considering it is a franchise that reboots from time to time. In fact, it helped to redeem Transformers after several years of the unpopular Unicron Trilogy (a series what was ruined by its heavily Japanese influence, in addition to the producers’ lack of knowledge about the Transformers; in a sense, this is reverse pseudo-anime). His love for Generation 1, in addition to the other continuities, all had references in Transformers Animated that were almost completely appropriately placed. It brings bask a similar look and feel that Generation 1 had, while at the same time having a much more modern atmosphere. While this show was aimed towards younger kids, especially the toys, older audiences could still enjoy the innovation and creativity that was put into this program. In fact, the design of the show opened more opportunities for the franchise to grow even more through multiple forms of media, the opportunity of which would go on to become Transformers Prime and the Aligned Continuity. However, nearly every other show he has since worked on was meant to be in some type of continuity with their respective prior installments, and by using the same methods of Transformers Animated on them, he began to ruin great works.

Scooby-Doo Mystery Incorporated is known as the first true example of Derrick J Wyatt’s work against shows he allegedly loved. His aim was to make the appearance parallel to that of the original 1969 series, but simultaneously have a modern setting that is meant to resemble that of the 2002 and 2004 live-action films. In fact, Shaggy’s voice actor changed from Casey Kasem, the original voice of Shaggy, to Matthew Lillard, who portrayed him in those movies. These contradictory opposites creating a vague setting, especially since the first two live-action Scooby-Doo movies were only meant to be a modern reincarnation of the show. Derrick J. Wyatt even puts them in a neighborhood called Crystal Cove, as opposed to their well-known city of Coolsville, simply to go along with the plot of the show. The plot gave the appearance of a kid-friendly version of Unnatural History; even with connected mysteries, this show began airing around the same time as it, and went into hiatus shortly after the season finale of Unnatural History. It has aired new episodes since then, but has aired at inconvenient timeslots, once again showing the impression that the show’s purpose of driving Unnatural History—and later Tower Prep—has been fulfilled, and the show no longer has any significance to Cartoon Network.

Aside from the setting, the characters themselves become examples of the simplicity and lack of depth that Derrick J. Wyatt possesses in his artwork. There are reused, generic character frames that are extremely inaccurate to characters; such include Fred, whose body resembles that of Transformers Animated Optimus Prime, or even Velma, whose body is identical to that of Daphne’s, but shorter. Romance is also irrelevantly used. While there has always been an appearance of possible feelings between Fred and Daphne, Derrick J. Wyatt takes it to an extreme, making Daphne lust for Fred and at the same time never gets noticed. Fred, on the other hand, obtains a sudden obsession for traps; while he has always had a knick for these in the show, in interest for them is even greater than his admiration for his friends or even his van. Similarly, a pairing between Velma and Shaggy has been introduced, which did not exist in any other Scooby-Doo show beforehand because of their differing personalities. Velma has focused more on Shaggy than anything, including her own personal interests. This creates a conflict for Shaggy, who no longer shares the same form of companionship with Scooby-Doo. Because of the simplicity of the designs, contradictory settings, subliminal purpose for production, and inaccuracy to the characters, this program lacks quality.

Because of the conformity Stuart Snyder wants in Cartoons, he has allowed Derrick J. Wyatt to work on other programs owned by Cartoon Network, and others have even been allowed to copy his similar art style in shows such as the Looney Toones show. Meanwhile, Derrick J. Wyatt had been working on Ben 10 for some time, ever since season 3 of Alien Force, and continually retrogressed the characters, look, and feel to mirror the original series. This began with the return of Vilgax, in spite of his supposed death, and even when Ben 10000 had confirmed in the show that Vilgax had since died; even the Vilgax of 30-year-old Ben Tennyson’s time was dressed identically to that of his original identity, indicating he would be killed off before long. The alleged death of Vilgax was actually appropriate for the Ben 10 franchise, considering the series would continue with an older Ben and in a new direction. It was no longer for the sake of having adventures with the Omnitrix, which was actually the reason Ben chose to take it off in the first place; he re-donned the device when the world was in danger, and only chose to keep it on in order to continue fighting injustice across the galaxy with the Plumbers. There was even a logical explanation as to why the Omnitrix changed appearance, and why ten new aliens were introduced opposed to any of the older ones. The new merchandise attempt worked and did not stand out because the plot fit around it well, as well as not having been overused.

But when Derrick J. Wyatt began making his changes to Ben 10, the factors that made Alien Force’s transition and changes smooth and successful were changed in favor of reversing the progress of the show. Even with Ben 10000’s similar look and feel to the original series, the alteration was rather dramatic, though through several steps. In addition to Vilgax’s return, the show’s plot format began to be repeated. With the future shows, the pattern would switch between the new arc and purpose of the show, and then Vilgax’s return. Between these episodes are often filler episodes; although they almost always revolve around Ben, the events of these episodes almost play no significance to the overall plot whatsoever, and leave numerous plot holes. Ultimate Alien was especially guilty of this, following its main “Ultimate” gimmick to make fans buy twice as many toys for their collection. But the most notable factor is Ben’s change in personality; he once again becomes an immature, stuck-up individual in spite of his setting out to act more like a hero; this was following numerous complaints among fantards that Ben wasn’t the way he used to be, because they were too blinded by nostalgia to see the development and maturity of Ben Tennyson. This view was shared by Derrick J. Wyatt, who sought out to change that by undoing the maturity of the characters. This gave Cartoon Network the idea to cater fantards. By appeasing certain things that these people wanted, even if it was in their own personal tastes and not in the best interest of the show, Cartoon Network did so in order to secure more ratings. This method eventually reached out to extreme methods, such as making people who do not even a care for the show blindly support it through ingratiation.

Omniverse brought the most dramatic alterations to Ben 10. Due to extreme loss of ratings in Ben 10 Ultimate Alien, along with Man of Action no longer interested in the franchise, Cartoon Network bought the rights to Ben 10 from them. Because of their “Cartoon Conformity” strategy, Derrick J. Wyatt received the opportunity to alter the Ben 10 universe in any way he desired. He chose to take over the plot and art design, nearly changing everything about Ben 10.

The show changed from Ben, Gwen, and Kevin’s different adventures on Earth, to being as many fans of Ben 10’s better days, “a pathetic tribute to the original series.” Not only to the characters, who are now adults, dress and act the same way they did when they were younger, but the show constantly flips between young Ben and adult Ben. This would create a difficult setting to follow if it was not for the events of the future being dependent on the events of the past in the respective episode. But at the same time, the events of Ben’s childhood defy the events of the original show. Ben was supposed to have taken off the Omnitrix at age ten and put it back on after five years. Yet Derrick J. Wyatt, backed by his fantards, wanted to see more of young Ben, even if it meant warping the chronology of the series. And then the explanation for all these contradictions and paradoxes is justified by an episode in which the universe is destroyed, and then recreated according to Ben’s interpretation of it. So not only is the universe deformed, but it is done because of Ben’s flaws, once again catering the fantards who want to see Ben as irresponsible as possible.

The altered universe has dramatically altered the characters. The attempt at creating old-fashioned characters in a modern setting, like in Scooby-Doo Mystery Incorporated, created a deformity to the characters that still strayed from the old feel of Ben 10. Ben, Gwen, and Kevin are reused body frames of Shaggy, Daphne/Velma, and Fred/Optimus Prime, respectively. Ben and Gwen even look and act like Shaggy and Velma in many ways. Ben dresses in green and brown, has an un-tucked shirt, a laid-back attitude, and a similar hairstyle to shaggy. Gwen has gotten much shorter, dresses in a shirt and skirt, and has somehow acquired freckles, both in her young and old incarnations, as well as a need for glasses. Her personality is rather intellectual, as well. Even Grandpa Max purposely looks more like the character he was based on—Captain Marvel—and Derrick J Wyatt admitted to it, and that being the reason for his squinted eyes. Aside from obvious similarities, these new appearances even make the characters look like other people. Now, Kevin resembles Marilyn Mansion, Grandpa Max looks like Mr. Magoo, and Professor Paradox reminds individuals of Reed Richards.On top of that, characters can even be stereotypical at times, especially non-Caucasian characters like Julie Yamamoto, who has pigtails, yellowish skin, and squinted brown eyes.

To sum up, Ben 10 Omniverse attempts to be centered around its own roots, when its development, which still brought it success without straying from the concept of the show, had never changed to begin with. It is as if a literal tree tried to grow downwards to be closer to its roots, and at the same time expect to survive unaided. It fails to realize that it is still connected to its roots, which is the mistake Derrick J. Wyatt made with this show. As for merchandise and profit, newer aliens are constantly being introduced, which either defeat the purpose of older aliens, or do not possess any powers at all. With the lack of seriousness portrayed in this show, it often looks like they are giving the message that actions do not have consequences, and even Vilgax’s constant returns show that.

And the analytics and critics of Derrick J. Wyatt’s work—those of us who want reform for the good of all Ben 10 fans, as well as the reservation of other action programming—are called “a handful of haters” by Derrick J. Wyatt, further proving the point that we are seen as haters when we are really expressing the deep truth.But sadly, fantards assume that Cartoon Network tells them everything, and that every work out of their corrupt mouths is completely true. They even believe they have a say in programming because of the polls and forum of their website; this, however, as expressed by Stuart Snyder’s fan input policy, is insignificant to any production of their programming (unless it helps them identify a way to cater them). Fantards are always calling us the haters, saying we should tolerate their addiction, yet they will not respect our decisions. If they are going to be hypocritical in their own views, we do not have to respect the stupidity and ignorance that form their uneducated, uninformed, and unjustified opinions. A free country especially does not justify stupidity, because with the power of freedom comes the responsibility to do what is best for everyone's interests, and that everybody knows what is good for each other through mutual understanding.

With the ongoing economic recession, Fusionfall’s programming company, Grigon, went bankrupt and defunct; its dying state was likely the reason why this company was initially selected by Stuart Snyder for Fusionfall. The series Level Up served as an excuse for Cartoon Network to not find a new programming company for Fusionfall after Grigon went bankrupt and defunct. Enough evidence regarding production chronology can even lead to a conjecture that this was also meant to eventually prevent the release of Code Lyoko Evolution in the United States. Production of Level up allegedly began around the same time that the fifth season of the Code Lyoko franchise had been announced. Even though Level Up has since ended its run, it was airing new episodes around the same time Moonscoop attempted to get Cartoon Network to dub and air Code Lyoko Evolution in the United States. Even more coincidental is the plot, which not only went into production the same time as Code Lyoko Evolution, but ran a shockingly similar plot of a virtual villain fighting teenage students in the real world. The game "Conqueror of all worlds" has a disturbing resemblance to "World of Warcraft" as well, in terms of concept. Overall, these shows accomplished their goal through different methods; to prevent any forms of Cartoon Network's past from resurfacing, and to fool new-gen fans into thinking they really are the first iconic success and staple to the network. Although Level Up has since been cancelled, this is only because it had served its stated purpose.

The following are a few additional traits that are shared by multiple shows, including ones that suffered the MTV effect. Firstly, the origin of newer programs has caused a decline in actual cartoons. Most of these creators were not working for these networks prior to their ideas for shows, and were either unaware or did not care for the principles that brought older shows success and fame. Unlike newer programs, the Cartoon Cartoons relied on standards of quality animation for success, instead of wheedling fans into falsely enjoying a show only due to escapism or surrealism. Not only that, but most of these programs existed in media elsewhere before, lowering the originality. In fact, most of Nickelodeon’s Nicktoons are television sequels or spin-offs of Dreamworks movies, and very few original works. Some have even been internet sensations that have just been copied for the sake of competing for online ratings. Often, these shows will even be in CGI animation, thus hardly registering as a cartoon. Because of all of these factors, less than half of the programs aired on Cartoon Network are owned and/or produced by them. Even worse is the appearance of drug usage for a show’s influence. Although the intimation of being under the influence of drugs may not have been intended among these show creators, it is not unlike the crime of plagiarism; it is the fact that the act has been committed, in great numbers, and without any justifiable reason whatsoever that stimulates accusations and convictions, whether by accident or on purpose. It gives the impression to viewers that doing drugs is alright if not only their celebrity role models and idols, but also their show creators may be doing it as well.

Another problem with the new programming, particularly on Cartoon Network, is how shockingly similar it is to some of Adult Swim's shows, almost appearing to be kid-friendly counterparts to them.

Adventure time reminds a lot of people of Superjail because of its art style, but Adventure Time’s problems go much farther than similar artistic effects. Firstly, this show first aired a pilot on Nickelodeon that failed. There was no direct reason stated for its failure, but the show’s subliminal appearance of an individual under the effects of LSD is widely accepted for the cause rather than a lack of ratings. After becoming an internet sensation, Cartoon Network picked it up, and allowed the show to become a cash cow once Stuart Snyder returned to power. However, the original purpose of acquiring the show was to attempt the MTV effect on Cartoon Network, especially since the pilot had originally aired on Nickelodeon. Stuart Snyder planned to use this program as the start of the MTV effect on the network, especially since it already had live-action programming and diminishing animated shows, both original and acquired. However, this plan backfired and resulted in his firing, and Adventure time would have become just another cartoon to air on Cartoon Network, while not erasing the network’s true roots. With the return of reruns, Penelton Ward could have seen and learned what his predecessors created and how it was done through honest means. But when Stuart Snyder’s return marked the expelling of almost all of Cartoon Network’s former programming, Adventure Time expanded into a so-called staple to the network, making new-gen fans truly believe that Cartoon Network’s greatness started with Adventure Time. Even Chowder and Flapjack, running shows that were not even receiving poorly in the start of the Check It era, were ended to make more room for Adventure Time.

Not only does the setting made no sense to begin with, but the setting is not explained until much further in the show. It is explained that the land of Ooo is post-apocalyptic earth, and that nuclear wars brought the destruction of mankind. Yet none of that explains the development of inanimate objects suddenly becoming sentient beings, let alone the fate of mankind (which must still exist if Finn is there). Penelton Ward has admitted to having taken inspiration from Candy Land and the Mario games for inspiration, which is the reason for the show’s utter randomness. As we have noted, the surrealism in shows, especially the abundant amount in this program, is the only thing contributing to the entertainment value; at the same time, fantards can only find the show amusing because of their belief in tolerance and conformity. They believe their love for Adventure Time justifies their love for the show by the most unorthodox means, loving it as much a person could be extremist with a religion, if not more. Yet they complain about those who are not bombastic with their interests, foolishly associating it with conformity. Yet they do not understand they are being conformists themselves by tricking their mind into willingly loving and accepting modern programming, with no regard to how the standards of quality may have changed, or even the impact on pop culture.

Fantards are only liking these shows for the immature and ignorant personalities of these shows’ characters, rather than looking deeper into the show. They claim that they can perceive depth through the show’s messages, but these morals and themes are inconsequential conflicts that only cause such a relative struggle because this program lacks role models that act out of logic, reason, and ideals, rather than for personal benefits or social status. Even the show’s main protagonist, Finn, has used lies, deception, and escapism to solve his problems. Even though he has good intentions, he is not limited to resort to such methods, and does so out of laziness, personal tastes, or to work in his favor. Once again, an immoral ideal is shown, fooling fans into thinking that taking the easy way out of a problem is alright. And minor morals introduced in this show, such as Bubblegum’s standing up to Richardio, have only been found deep for being a play on words.

In our movement, we have discovered reason to believe that these children's networks, Cartoon Network in particular, have been using online communities such as deviantART in order to have fans blindly support their shows through the bad character traits that are expressed in their shows. In addition, two aspects of Adventure Time, the lesbian pairing Bubbline and the transgendered universe of Fionna and Cake, were deliberately used to have fetishists and Yuri artists, especially explicit ones, to support the show as well, even if they care more for the fetish than the actual show. The catering of fantards to an extreme extent has also been a cover-up for Cartoon Network’s lack of tolerance for homosexuality. One episode of Dexter’s Laboratory was banned for having a gay person in it, the Silver Spooner, who was hardly a gay stereotype. Yet at the same time, Dukey from Johnny Test does in fact act like a stereotype of a homosexual, and the show indirectly implies that his misfortunes are a result from his actions (of acting gay).

Regular show is a lot like Aqua Teen because of the copied plot format. Often, the plot revolves around the main characters interacting, often acting annoyed or obnoxious towards one another, and believing they are cool for doing so. Even when a show Ed, Edd, ‘n’ Eddy had immature and ignorant characters, they at least had a character to play the voice of reason, which made the show justifiable in the sense that they are not only kids, but that the show is not filled with bad role models alone. Regular Show, however, has no indication of good judgment among any character, which in turn makes everybody learn from their mistakes right as the main conflict—almost always something apocalyptic—occurs, and they are forced to change their ways unwillingly in order to save themselves. While Aqua Teen Hunger Force does not always have a resolved conflict in their episodes, the only reason that Regular Show has a resolution, in addition to the character’s temporary realization of their personal problems, is to appease the adults that had a problem with their earlier programs. But the majority of the stated issues with this show, including the overall appearance of it, have been noted to resemble similar experiences with the brain under the use of cocaine.

The new MAD series is far too much like Robot Chicken. Although MAD came out long before Adult Swim was even launched, Stuart Snyder wanted to air it for the purpose of having a parody-based show like its late-night counterpart. The problem with MAD is that the jokes and gags get old due to excessive use, repeated jokes and attitude, and the use of parodies based on any possible pun they can make out of the title, even ones which spark simple crossovers more than humorous ideas. Overall, the humor in the show is seen as gross, immature, and offensive. To avoid deformation of fictional characters and real people, Robot Chicken says in the intro "Any likeliness of celebrities or actual names are used in a fictuous and parodic manner." MAD, on the other hand, says no warning regarding the accuracy to the people, places, things, and ideas they portray. Not only that, but MAD even makes references to Adult Swim shows like Family guy and King of the Hill. If the targeted audience is supposed to be younger than that of Adult Swim, even with a TV-PG rating, why do they make references to adult shows? It is certainly not to have older audiences go back and realize those shows were present, as it was already easily identifiable to begin with. This is once again an example of a show that attempts to push the censor and associate itself with adult shows and movies, while Cartoon Network can water it down from time to time in order to get away with what many parents complained about.

Gumball is another imitative program. Shockingly similar to Drawn Together, most of the characters are animated and drawn differently. The creator of the show’s intent was to have other people create their own characters and stories out of rejected characters that had been created for commercials, and unify them under a school setting. Not only were these characters essentially unchanged, but the setting is rather similar to Doug; young adolescents facing everyday life, but at the same time the ideas for episodes are either too trivial, or make no sense at all due to lack of a uniform setting created by the overly-diverse characters. While a variety of characters might sound like a good thing, there is no logical explanation in the show as to why none of the characters are similar, and the only way to enjoy this show is to ignore this issue in spite of its primary presence. But in addition, the show itself hardly qualifies as a real cartoon to begin with. Aside from lacking quality standards, it is done entirely by flash and with live-action backgrounds.

As opinionated as quality animation may sound, this IS a concrete explanation of quality and how it ceased to exist. Peter Cullen once said in a Toonami promo that “Quality speaks for itself.” And it truly does. While it is thought that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, that adage describes a different type of quality standards. In these networks, there are two types of quality standards; general appeal and individual appeal.

General appeal is the standards that which we preach, which have numerous varying factors, not all of which have been completely identified. These aspects include certain balances, such as originality versus imitative and light mood versus dark mood. Other non-contradictory aspects should be present, no matter what; if two of such cannot coexist in a program due to being the opposite of one another, then one of them does not belong.

One particular example is genre. Too often, kids’ action shows are filled in by an overly-light mood or uncalled for humor. It ultimately gives the innuendo that the heroes are actually fighting a bully who has no evil intent, and the heroes only try to stop him for the sake of bringing him down. Sometimes, there may not be an evil motivation behind the villain, and the cliché of evil laughter is often used. In fact, this makes the heroes appear to be more like the bully than the hero himself. The main cause of this in dubbed non-American animation is censorship.

Another factor is the intent of the show. One must consider why a network might want to create a certain show or type of show. For example, think of shows that were made only to push the MTV effect forward. The problem with that is that when these networks focus solely on only a few new aspects they intend to alter, they do not consider how it will affect the quality of the rest of it, not unlike how the purpose of Toonami’s TOM 4 era was focused on giving TOM a face and making him look more realistic.

Petition continued here; http://fusion-bioformer[dot]tumblr[dot]com/post/46190481861/petition-continued-from-change-org
Peter Carr
2013-11-28 21:59:04 UTC
Permalink
Something you seem to have forgotten. As a Creative Development Producer-Series Television who has created, developed and sold a number of both internationally successful and branded animated & live action episodic series over the last 20 years I'm well versed in your claims. However you fail to realize the fact that television, like any filmed entertainment, isn't about quality. It never has and never will. It's about the dollar, or as you call it the ‘cash cow’. End of story.
Post by t***@gmail.com
This is part of our plan to save Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Disney Channel for future generations. People might say they like the new programs due to its relative quality, but they are being deprived of true quality animation. This is also a plan to preserve the state of quality on these networks to their highest points, only allowing them to improve.
This movement is often mistaken for “bringing the 90’s shows back into production and cancelling all of the current running shows.” That is not what we intend to do, albeit we are heavily influenced by the significant quality of 90’s programming. Without the presence of more reruns on the main networks, the audience and the executives both forget what brought the 90’s shows its fame and identity; high standards of qualities while coinciding with the pop culture at the time to a reasonable amount. This is why people can go back to shows of earlier generations and still find programs mostly amusing. Nowadays, television shows are so obsessed with being a part of pop culture that they forget to include the quality that makes a program memorable in the first place. Our explanation is long, but paramount to read in order to understand. I will also explain the change in quality over the years, and how these facts are separated from our own individual interpretations. Before reading this, understand that these are not our opinions, but the history of children’s television for the last 15 years. Any statement said is the cold hard truth and should not be understood as “hate.”
As mentioned before, the current competing networks too often focus on competition, and forget “quality over quantity.” It is this notion that makes networks abandon their roots, especially ones that had brought them fame and success that they had rightfully deserved. While many modern shows are supposedly successful on Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Disney Channel, they did not achieve that success through the quality of their programming. Often times, the gap between the successful and unsuccessful shows is too great, not unlike the gap between the rich and the poor social classes. In addition, the fans who remained faithful to these networks were often hypnotized into blindly supporting a certain show, a term of which I will explain later called a fantard. One final concept I will expand upon is the use of copying methods from other networks, including ones that do not specialize in children’s programming.
This decline began over several steps, primarily with Cartoon Network’s programming. Parents of that generation, often the stereotypical “soccer mom” or “control freak parents,” had blamed the shows of the last generation for anything that they did not like about their children. Although many of these shows had admirable, moral role models, in addition to other, less intelligent characters of whom the creators wanted to ensure would not be desired to be imitated, those parents, who were blinded by unawareness, believed that having those shows cancelled would fix this supposed problem. They also complained about inappropriate sexual humor and violence; however, the incognito humor of most 90’s programming was hidden well enough to pass over the minds of little children, and the violent shows had a more mature rating. It was the parents’ responsibilities to attempt to understand the mindset of their children, as well as prevent them from watching violent programming. The latter was the reason the programming block Toonami was moved from weekdays to Saturday nights in April 2004. Yet these parents were still unsatisfied. They wanted to remove any and all violence from these networks, instead of facing their fears and teaching children to be better than what they see on television. It is the very reason more mature shows on these networks have a warning that states “parental guidance is suggested/viewer discretion is advised.” Yet these adults also prevented their kids from watching the shows that were actually appropriate for their age group, and only because of certain references they would not even understand until they were older. While many worse intimations permeate the current programming of these networks, they are unseen by those same types of parents, despite the fact that it was what they were hoping television shows would avoid. This controversy has been spread throughout all three networks, but especially Nickelodeon. Most of the original Cartoon Cartoons stopped airing for a different reason, but many Nicktoons were known for secretly pushing the censors in adult jokes. One of the most notable in their programming, despite being live-action, was Britney Spears's performance at the 1999 Kids Choice Awards, which she made apparent she was not wearing a bra under her clothes.
To diminish the demographic-oriented blocks and the sister networks, they merged the two; while The N and Noggin were relatable to TEENick and Nick Jr. respectively, they sister networks were not meant to fall under the same name due to their dramatically differing programming. Nicktoons Network also fell under this category, although it was mistakenly associated with Nickelodeon due to its splat logo and reruns of older Nick programming. Cyma Zargahmi began to move the blocks that were on Nickelodeon to the sister networks; although the programming remained on the main channel, the Nicktoons and TEENick blocks were discontinued so she could rebrand all four networks in fall 2009. She forced these networks under one common appearance to encourage conformity, as well as have the cash cows infect the other networks, in addition to the already-existing cash cows air more often.
Cyma doesn’t realize that if she had not altered the demographics for the main and sister networks, there would not be a need for rebranding Nickelodeon. In fact, ICarly, Victorious, and even Dora the Explorer became Cash Cows under her command, and due to her obsession of girl power. “I think for all kids, but for girls in particular, that the opportunities presented to them and the people around them are critically important to their success, particularly as tweens.” Not only does this give an intimation of being sexist, but she is also completely ignorant to positive influences. In fact, her cash cows actually destroyed opportunities in a sense, and made tweens think they had to be more like what they were seeing more often on TV.
“Girls today need to have a great opinion of themselves, no matter what, they need to have confidence in what they want to do, and they need to have confidence in what they don’t know yet.” Which is like saying Adolf Hitler should be proud for killing 8 million Jews, whether he knew or not, or even considered, who or how he might be hurting others. This blind confidence boosts the ignorance to “justify” the expansion of the cash cows, and would ultimately give other networks an alleged justification for creating cash cows themselves. “And they need to be able to ask a lot of questions, and they need people to be able to ask those questions of. Girls need great role models, girls need opportunities, and they need to be inspired along every step of the way to do great things.” On the contrary, Nickelodeon’s leading female role models, Miranda Cosgrove and Victoria Justice, play the roles of ignorant teenagers who only find happiness through fame or musical talent, and often make irrational decisions without any parental consent or guidance. In fact, Victoria Justice has been seen wearing more revealing clothing than most women in adult films. “I think the more that girls are encouraged to do anything and everything that boys are able to do is also a great thing.” In other words, she is attempting reverse sexism. It can be conjectured that her prejudice towards males in Nickelodeon programming may have something to do with her Iranian Heritage, more specifically the heavy Muslim influence in that area. Additionally, religion plays a minor role in networking, although more in Disney Channel than any of the three mainstream networks at the time. It is important to remember that Nickelodeon is iconic because it had a great representation of kids’ interests and desires, while giving important life lessons in their shows so kids could truly learn what is good for them and others. Modern Nickelodeon is deliberately dramatically different from the old network because Cyma wants to throw away true fan representation in favor of appeasing adults. Mainstream media is purposely forcing cash cows and conformity down everyone’s throats, and it is important to have morality behind television production.
Disney copied the MTV effect as well, with even more unrealistic aspects of life, particularly in High School, with Disney's hidden, twisted racism becoming more present; this started movies like High School Musical. From then on, all of their showed involve some sort of romance-oriented musical, and every primary Disney celebrity was required to be a singer (as well as every singer being an actor, as portrayed by the series, “Jonas”). In addition, Disney showed more of their racism by substituting Black people with Indians, and Jewish people with Asians. Newer programs have also proven to be constantly unoriginal and make religious references. In fact, the only reason Isabella Garcia-Sheppiro from Phineas and Ferb was chosen to be Jewish was so she could disprove her own faith in their Christmas Special (hence the reason she brings up her faith at that point in the show). Yet at the same time that Disney appears to be against Judaism, they are run by Jewish individuals that have aspersed the German population through stereotypes, likely as a result of the horrors of the Holocaust. Most notable examples include “the antagonist[s] in some of their kids shows…implied to be German or of Germanic decent…The EVIL Dr."Doofenshmirtz" is from "Drooslestien" and is the antagonist of Phineas And Ferb…in the show they show him with a racist backstory with much and overly dramatized German stereotypes, Lederhosen, thick Germanic accents (Which is actually mentioned by Mr. Fletcher in the series) as well as other things. In American Dragon Jake Long, Professor Rotwood, ALSO the show's antagonist is very shrill and is trying to expose Jake as a dragon. He also has a similar backstory which it goes into with stereotypes in one episode which I believe the name of the episode is "Dreamscape", as well as the fact he uses Germanic phrases (He also speaks with a thick accent) such as "Schnell!" or "Nein!” In addition, the original Suite Life of Zack and Cody; the antagonist of the Hotel Tipton is a German woman (who also has a thick accent and ludicrously loud obnoxious tone)” (Towerpreracademy).
While a handful of decent cartoons were created during this time, they all suffered the same fate of cancellation (some of which were prematurely cancelled) due to the rising cash cows. In fact, many of the newer animated programs, both of high and low-quality, were simply produced by Disney and the creators had no prior work experience with Disney. Unlike Nickelodeon however, Disney Channel focused on making their live-action cash cows become fangirl obsessions and teen idols. This is the reason that Disney’s 65-episode rule was created in the late 2000’s, and it would only apply to shows that debuted after it took effect (hence why Phineas and Ferb is able to defy that decree). In addition, the focus on these musical-based programs caused the decadence and eventual removal of Disney’s action block, Jetix, which had kid-friendly shows and a few iconic animes (due to differences in programming and schedule generally did not compete with Toonami, despite popular belief). While live-action cash cows do not last as long as animated ones because of the actors’ continuous aging, they made more of a profit this way from unsuspecting children and adults. Disney claims to be parent-approved, but the only parents that displayed their approbation were overly-protective control freaks and soccer moms. Yet like in the censorship controversy with Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, they were as naïve as their own children in the sense of subliminal messages. If adults truly cared as much as we do for the well-being of future generations, they should not let Disney, in addition to the other two mainstream children’s networks, to continue down the destructive path they are following.
Disney Channel has been teaching kids, starting with the same unsuspecting generation, to "follow your dreams." However, they also essentially force worship on the unsuspecting addicts of their shows; in other words, these people are following the dreams that Disney is forcing on them, while fooling them into believing they can actually find true happiness by appeasing the people of Disney. While it is essential to help others find happiness in order to achieve it oneself, completely disregarding one’s own happiness in order to fulfill the greedy desires of corrupt people will only make a person feel good so long as the other one accepts them simply for making them happy. That is the kind of relationship Disney has with their millions of blindly-devoted fans; none of them actually try to obtain personal happiness by their own means, but rather by solely appeasing their peers and Disney. While Disney cannot punish a defiant person directly, the social conformity encouraged by Disney Channel’s current programming will make that person suffer from their peers’ lack of tolerance.
Too often does Disney, as well as Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, want fans to use their shows as escapism. Many supporters even claim that watching those shows makes them feel good because they can escape the numerous hardships of the real world. That reasoning is basically the same mindset that drug addicts use to justify their addiction. Aside from the differences of the dangers, any type of addiction can be negative. These new programs have only encouraged the detachment more by making the unrealistic lives of fictional characters appear worth living. “The importance of quality for kids nowadays is excruciatingly important because what the 90's and early 2000's brought to television for kids and preteens made life worth living…The three brands need to make more high quality series teaching about how to correctly live….It’s infuriating to see the cartoons that taught us from the 90's and early 2000's [have] to complete [with] shit of what's on now” (David McGee). Instead of giving viewers a false sense of hope for what life can become, children’s shows should attempt to be more relatable to the viewers so they can truly reflect it on their own lives in a positive manner, and see how they can actually improve their own lives instead of always yearning for empty dreams.
For example; if a person really wanted to follow a career of becoming a singer or actor, they should constantly strive to improve. They should be concerned equally with their talent and personal enjoyment, and potential profit to a lesser degree. This is another flaw of many of not only television’s current singers, but also all of the people who perform any form of art for the three channels. Singers too often resort to Autotunes for their own talent, as well as focus on the money they will make, that they completely forget what real talent is. And this ignorance among people is what leads to the amount of scandals that Disney and Nickelodeon celebrities have been involved in.
In January 2007, Adult Swim was advertising their Aqua Teen Hunger Force Movie with LED lights of the Mooninites, scattered in 10 different cities, one of which was Boston. Some people mistook the lights for explosive devices, thus causing the 2007 Boston Bomb Scare. Jim Samples, the old President, was forced to resign, and he was replaced by Stuart Snyder, an infamous man for good reasons. Like Cyma, he planned to change the network in his own image instead of what was good for the fans.
Stuart Snyder is perhaps most known for having replaced Fridays with Fired Dynamite, and replaced Toonami with Live-action on CARTOON network, because he claimed to not like anime. He closed any and all fan input, and there is no longer any group of people working at Cartoon Network that represent the interests of true fans because of his restructured production team. This essentially parallels that of a dictator in a communist society, especially keeping the minds of those he wants to manipulate under the level of awareness which he chooses, at least in regard to the production that was going behind the future shows. The following explanation regarding Stuart Snyder and his impact is far more complicated than the MTV effect, especially since Cartoon Network generally did not focus on musical-based programming. While there were occasional celebrity endorsements, these people never intended to be associated with Cartoon Network or its programming, much like Will.i.am ever since his song “Secret Formula” for the show Dexter’s Laboratory. Even the program Class of 3000 would have never turned the network in a different direction; in fact, the unique beats and songs from Andre 3000 would have made the program iconic had the show not been cancelled due to a plagiarism lawsuit (and as far as we know, Stuart Snyder was not involved in this case).
Firstly, the cajolement of the viewers into accepting lower, if none at all, standards of quality animation. For such a reason, Cartoon Network became more heavily dependent on Canadian programming before it could install cash cows of its own. This, however, is primarily because Stuart Snyder could not make a cash cow out of the Powerpuff Girls, the longest running show on Cartoon Network at the time, after Craig McCracken turned down the offer of another season of the show. Surprisingly, McCracken’s decision was for the very prevention of his show of becoming a cash cow.
The most infamous Canadian show that does this is Johnny Test, which has nearly run even longer than any other Cartoon Network or Teletoon show in terms of episode production. Numerous others were used as well, but Johnny Test eventually became its main focus due to higher ratings. As a result, it not only replaced the decent (in terms of intended quality) Canadian shows such as 6teen and Stoked, but also took over the times and positions of nearly all other shows. In other words, Johnny Test’s success was at the expense of other shows, another tactic that made shows become cash cows. The excess profit is done by it taking over the timeslots of other programs, almost to a point of being "filler" for Cartoon Network's programming.
Stuart Snyder attempted to make cash cows out of as many genres as possible. Even though Cartoon Network’s only prime time cash cows would come from Canada for a few years, the action and anime business began to dwindle. Cartoon Network began to deliberately focus on Ben 10, although its standards of quality were not yet lowered. The purpose of Ben 10’s inflation was to get rid of nearly every anime program on Cartoon Network, and he would be able to do so by destroying the long-running and well-known action and anime block, Toonami. Ben 10 would eventually go on to become a monopoly, but it would not do so until after Stuart Snyder made sure it completed its first mission of removing Toonami from Cartoon Network. Shows that Ben 10 caused to cancel afterward include the You Are Here block, The Secret Saturdays, Generator Rex, Green Lantern, Thundercats, Young Justice, and the DC Nation Block. The majority of these revolved around merchandise and ratings, simply because they were not making as much of a relative profit to Ben 10 (but were still making sufficient success).
Although there are other reasons for Cartoon Network's current lack of anime, including the problems between Bandai America and Bandai Japan, it mainly sprouted from Snyder. When they stopped listening to the fans, they also copied several minor strategies from the MTV effect, particularly the inclusion of live-action programming on, as stated before, a channel that specializes in animated programming.
In order to expurgate all anime from Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder used the Cash Cow scheme on the most popular anime (in addition to the most beloved action series, Ben 10), Naruto. Despite popular belief, Stuart Snyder was not responsible for the TOM 4 era. Although Sean Akins and Jason DeMarco were perhaps mistaken in entirely changing the block around, Stuart Snyder wanted to make the new look and feel as infamous as possible so it would lose viewers and thus get cancelled. He did so by over-endorsing Naruto on purpose, because he knew Naruto fans were often hardcore and in great numbers. He even allowed unaired episodes of the show to be shown on the American website, to steal ratings from Toonami. As a result, like Johnny Test and Ben 10, Naruto began to cause other anime programs on the block to be removed, the most well-known of which are BoBoBo-Bo Bo-BoBo and One Piece.
For this reason, Toonami’s running time was cut down to two hours in October 2007. Naruto was still emphasized on the block due to demands of Stuart Snyder, even though the block was in desperate need of newer programming. Even so, Naruto still aired for an hour on the block, technically making up half of its programming and the majority of its ratings (the latter is partially because it has taken over other show’s places). A small sense of hope came in the middle of 2008, with shows such as Batman the Brave and the Bold, Star Wars the Clone Wars, and the Secret Saturdays approaching later that year. These shows could have theoretically saved Toonami from cancellation, and survived on American programming like it once did until their decaying budget could license new animes. But at that point, Stuart Snyder had the Toonami schedule changed again—this time, with the addition of Ben 10 Alien Force and Samurai Jack—to make Naruto the only show with premieres. This imbalance, along with Naruto’s sudden jump to a filler arc, toppled Toonami and resulted in its cancellation on September 20, 2008. Since then, none of those anime programs—along with nearly all of Toonami’s former shows—have ever aired.
The only animes that remain on Cartoon Network to this day are long-running programs such as Pokémon, which Stuart Snyder has attempted to make a cash cow as well, and pseudo-anime, which is an imitation of Japanese styles that is usually done by wither American or Korean show creators. Either way, the quality in both kinds of shows is low in America, partially due to censorship. As a result, the anime industry, which had essentially been introduced to America by Toonami, suffered a four year recession (which only began to improve by the revival of Toonami by Adult Swim) due to lack of networks willing to dub their programming and pirating that Stuart Snyder basically introduced and allowed. However, the only time Cartoon Network, or any of these three networks, will make copyright claims is when it works in their favor, such as blocking access to view older shows.
Meanwhile, the abandonment of Japanese programming brought further dependency on Canadian programming, while the interest for newer shows turned in favor of live-action programming. While there had been a few failed attempts at putting live-action on Cartoon Network, such as the movie Re-Animated and its television continuation Out of Jimmy’s Head, as well as the Fried Dynamite Block, the “Fall” era, Cartoon Network planned on adding live-action more than ever before following Toonami’s cancellation. With the Nood era, Cartoon Network was easily able to stray from its roots and make new-gen fans unaware of the network’s past, even with mention of past shows on their website, as well as the Massive Multiplayer Online Game, Fusionfall. However, the schedule of Cartoon Network to this day has either purged all former programming, or placed it in an inconvenient timeslot in which viewers will not know if or when to watch. Because of the absence of Cartoon Network’s former standards of quality animation, fans could fool themselves into thinking they were watching the epitome of quality animation, as a result of human nature to cope with life, especially if one cannot see injustice behind it. In addition, Fusionfall was a game which required a subscription, which was often difficult for fans to obtain due to the economic recession of the United States at the time. Once again, Stuart Snyder knew the effects of his decisions and chose them because of the desired effect.
The introduction of live-action permanently maimed Cartoon Network for all its years to date. Since the official introduction of live-action, including reality and game shows, the network has strayed from its initial mission of being full of primarily multiple, domestic, animated programs and foreign and acquired programming being a secondary fulfillment (and the large amount of Japanese anime was due to the success of its first priority, which remained through the years until Snyder took over). Firstly, live-action shows were used to create shows whose concepts were copied from others; among these were attempted kid-friendly versions of paranormal shows (The Othersiders), Taxi Ride (Brainrush), Survival-themed shows (Survive This), Mythbusters (Dude, What Would Happen), America’s Funniest Home Videos (Bobby says), and even Japan’s Human Tetris (Hole in the Wall).
However, the extreme purging and censorship of the past, combined with the removal of anime and all of the Cartoon Cartoons, unoriginal live-action shows on a network dedicated to cartoons, corrupt actions of Stuart Snyder, and over-airing of Canadian shows and cash cows, pushed many fans of Cartoon Network to protest. In June of 2010, Stuart Snyder was removed from power. As a result, nearly all of his damages were immediately undone, and the rest of his changes appeared to be in the process of being reversed. Reruns of quite a few Cartoon Network series began to return to the network during the day. Johnny test slowly began to dwindle since the beginning of that year, allowing 6teen and subsequently Stoked to continue airing new episodes in the US, and 6teen even had the opportunity to finish its run. Live-action was almost eliminated from Cartoon Network altogether; only two of the original reality shows remained (although had one yet to air), and the block CN Real and the live-action bumpers were dropped altogether. While the program Unnatural History was introduced and perhaps did not belong on Cartoon Network, the effort, well execution of the program, and lack of emphasis on high school life made it a mystery series with much positive potential. A new logo and era were unveiled, which was more reflective on Cartoon Network’s past; not only was the checkerboard reintroduced for the first time since the network’s first rebrand, but the “Check It” era was meant to be a redux of Cartoon Network’s first era, the checkerboard era, further emphasizing the recollection of the past while positively evolving towards the future. Fusionfall began to reach a seemingly growing greatness, especially having become free to play earlier that year, and it gave Adventure Time a proper introduction to Cartoon Network without inflating it. Ben 10 went on to an extended hiatus; with this, the cancellation of the You Are Here block (which actually resulted from Ben 10 forcing the other programs into cancellation), the introduction of Generator Rex, and Sym-Bionic Titan and a new season of Star Wars the Clone Wars on the horizon, much hope came for the return of Toonami, since the beginning of the fall would also mark the block’s two year cancellation anniversary.
But all hopes to rebuild the future in a reflection of the past—a major ideology of Cartoon Network, especially with Hanna-Barbara cartoons, was quashed by Stuart Snyder’s return to power in August 2010. Johnny Test’s airing time increased once again to exclude Stoked (which played a role of “succeeding” 6teen at the time); Stuart Snyder also began making Adventure Time into a cash cow, preventing all of the past prime time cartoons from airing on Cartoon Network anymore until newer shows, which lowered the standards of quality dramatically, debuted. Live action turned in the wrong direction again, with Unnatural History being cancelled and more focus on Dude What Would Happen and Destroy Build Destroy (the last of the original CN real shows). After Tower Prep, another live-action mystery series on Cartoon Network, was released and shortly after cancelled, Cartoon network created Hole in The Wall, the description of which has already been mentioned. He even introduced a live-action awards show, Hall of Game Awards, which has aired annually since February 2011.
Even revivals of older shows, such as a fifth season of Courage the Cowardly Dog or even a sequel to Codename Kids Next Door, were now impossible. Updates in Fusionfall became scarce, and eventually simply became the addition of nanos from the newer programming, as an attempt to endorse the cash cows. Any and all dreams of a returning Toonami dissipated with the return of Ben 10 premieres, as well as a block that began to symbolize the conformity that Stuart Snyder created upon his return to Cartoon Network. “‘Night of Action’ in no way shape or form compares to Toonami. It doesn't compare to it on a content, execution, presentation, or like-ability standpoint and it is obvious CN wants action fans who loved Toonami to come back, but they won't… unless you bring it back” (Flapperdoodle's Gaming Blog Ep. 26: Five Reasons Why Cartoon Network is NO Longer Awesome!).
Following the end of Ben 10 Alien Force’s second season, Cartoon Network hired Derrick J. Wyatt to work on the show’s art and story, as well as other programs for the network. Derrick J. Wyatt is perhaps the epitome of a fantard. He, like the urban definition of a fantard, is a “Person who obsesses over a series (TV, book, movie etc.) and acts annoyingly like it’s the best thing ever made. Most fantards…are motivated by blind loyalty...Fantards are also known to be really rude to people who go against their precious fandom and don't practice…any type of preference tolerance” (“Fantard”). Like others who are too devoted to a particular form of media, they are what essentially ruin great franchises due to their inability to see if or when the quality declines, and become the reason that a particular series is over-continued. Derrick J. Wyatt had the power to undo the corruption in Cartoon Network’s programs, especially since he was rather down-to-earth towards the fans. But at the same time, those types of whom he was close with were the same types of unhealthy addicts to media, hence his fame and success between Cartoon network and among his followers. His art style is most criticized, not necessarily for his lack of talent or original programs (both of which are still major problems nonetheless), but rather his misinterpretation of shows that he most enjoys, and consequently deforms various Cartoon Network shows, specifically shows that Turner Broadcasting both owns and has the full rights to.
Upon several complaints regarding his work, Derrick J. Wyatt claimed that those who did not appreciate his work did not know anything about animation or arts; yet at the same time, a formal education is not required to conclude that Derrick J. Wyatt on the other hand, does not know anything about quality animation or how art and animation are appropriately incorporated into it. Even when his art style suggests he knows nothing about art and animation himself, how it was used in shows he has worked on is another aspect that infuriates fans.
Even Cartoon Network’s refusal to take fan input has not hindered Derrick J. Wyatt. Even on his deviantART account, he uploads fan art of shows he has not ever worked on, once again abiding by his own interpretation of the characters more than factors that make such characters, especially in multiple incarnations of them, memorable and iconic to fans.
Perhaps the one show he worked on with his art style was actually appropriate for its franchise; Transformers Animated. The severe alteration was appropriate for the Transformers, considering it is a franchise that reboots from time to time. In fact, it helped to redeem Transformers after several years of the unpopular Unicron Trilogy (a series what was ruined by its heavily Japanese influence, in addition to the producers’ lack of knowledge about the Transformers; in a sense, this is reverse pseudo-anime). His love for Generation 1, in addition to the other continuities, all had references in Transformers Animated that were almost completely appropriately placed. It brings bask a similar look and feel that Generation 1 had, while at the same time having a much more modern atmosphere. While this show was aimed towards younger kids, especially the toys, older audiences could still enjoy the innovation and creativity that was put into this program. In fact, the design of the show opened more opportunities for the franchise to grow even more through multiple forms of media, the opportunity of which would go on to become Transformers Prime and the Aligned Continuity. However, nearly every other show he has since worked on was meant to be in some type of continuity with their respective prior installments, and by using the same methods of Transformers Animated on them, he began to ruin great works.
Scooby-Doo Mystery Incorporated is known as the first true example of Derrick J Wyatt’s work against shows he allegedly loved. His aim was to make the appearance parallel to that of the original 1969 series, but simultaneously have a modern setting that is meant to resemble that of the 2002 and 2004 live-action films. In fact, Shaggy’s voice actor changed from Casey Kasem, the original voice of Shaggy, to Matthew Lillard, who portrayed him in those movies. These contradictory opposites creating a vague setting, especially since the first two live-action Scooby-Doo movies were only meant to be a modern reincarnation of the show. Derrick J. Wyatt even puts them in a neighborhood called Crystal Cove, as opposed to their well-known city of Coolsville, simply to go along with the plot of the show. The plot gave the appearance of a kid-friendly version of Unnatural History; even with connected mysteries, this show began airing around the same time as it, and went into hiatus shortly after the season finale of Unnatural History. It has aired new episodes since then, but has aired at inconvenient timeslots, once again showing the impression that the show’s purpose of driving Unnatural History—and later Tower Prep—has been fulfilled, and the show no longer has any significance to Cartoon Network.
Aside from the setting, the characters themselves become examples of the simplicity and lack of depth that Derrick J. Wyatt possesses in his artwork. There are reused, generic character frames that are extremely inaccurate to characters; such include Fred, whose body resembles that of Transformers Animated Optimus Prime, or even Velma, whose body is identical to that of Daphne’s, but shorter. Romance is also irrelevantly used. While there has always been an appearance of possible feelings between Fred and Daphne, Derrick J. Wyatt takes it to an extreme, making Daphne lust for Fred and at the same time never gets noticed. Fred, on the other hand, obtains a sudden obsession for traps; while he has always had a knick for these in the show, in interest for them is even greater than his admiration for his friends or even his van. Similarly, a pairing between Velma and Shaggy has been introduced, which did not exist in any other Scooby-Doo show beforehand because of their differing personalities. Velma has focused more on Shaggy than anything, including her own personal interests. This creates a conflict for Shaggy, who no longer shares the same form of companionship with Scooby-Doo. Because of the simplicity of the designs, contradictory settings, subliminal purpose for production, and inaccuracy to the characters, this program lacks quality.
Because of the conformity Stuart Snyder wants in Cartoons, he has allowed Derrick J. Wyatt to work on other programs owned by Cartoon Network, and others have even been allowed to copy his similar art style in shows such as the Looney Toones show. Meanwhile, Derrick J. Wyatt had been working on Ben 10 for some time, ever since season 3 of Alien Force, and continually retrogressed the characters, look, and feel to mirror the original series. This began with the return of Vilgax, in spite of his supposed death, and even when Ben 10000 had confirmed in the show that Vilgax had since died; even the Vilgax of 30-year-old Ben Tennyson’s time was dressed identically to that of his original identity, indicating he would be killed off before long. The alleged death of Vilgax was actually appropriate for the Ben 10 franchise, considering the series would continue with an older Ben and in a new direction. It was no longer for the sake of having adventures with the Omnitrix, which was actually the reason Ben chose to take it off in the first place; he re-donned the device when the world was in danger, and only chose to keep it on in order to continue fighting injustice across the galaxy with the Plumbers. There was even a logical explanation as to why the Omnitrix changed appearance, and why ten new aliens were introduced opposed to any of the older ones. The new merchandise attempt worked and did not stand out because the plot fit around it well, as well as not having been overused.
But when Derrick J. Wyatt began making his changes to Ben 10, the factors that made Alien Force’s transition and changes smooth and successful were changed in favor of reversing the progress of the show. Even with Ben 10000’s similar look and feel to the original series, the alteration was rather dramatic, though through several steps. In addition to Vilgax’s return, the show’s plot format began to be repeated. With the future shows, the pattern would switch between the new arc and purpose of the show, and then Vilgax’s return. Between these episodes are often filler episodes; although they almost always revolve around Ben, the events of these episodes almost play no significance to the overall plot whatsoever, and leave numerous plot holes. Ultimate Alien was especially guilty of this, following its main “Ultimate” gimmick to make fans buy twice as many toys for their collection. But the most notable factor is Ben’s change in personality; he once again becomes an immature, stuck-up individual in spite of his setting out to act more like a hero; this was following numerous complaints among fantards that Ben wasn’t the way he used to be, because they were too blinded by nostalgia to see the development and maturity of Ben Tennyson. This view was shared by Derrick J. Wyatt, who sought out to change that by undoing the maturity of the characters. This gave Cartoon Network the idea to cater fantards. By appeasing certain things that these people wanted, even if it was in their own personal tastes and not in the best interest of the show, Cartoon Network did so in order to secure more ratings. This method eventually reached out to extreme methods, such as making people who do not even a care for the show blindly support it through ingratiation.
Omniverse brought the most dramatic alterations to Ben 10. Due to extreme loss of ratings in Ben 10 Ultimate Alien, along with Man of Action no longer interested in the franchise, Cartoon Network bought the rights to Ben 10 from them. Because of their “Cartoon Conformity” strategy, Derrick J. Wyatt received the opportunity to alter the Ben 10 universe in any way he desired. He chose to take over the plot and art design, nearly changing everything about Ben 10.
The show changed from Ben, Gwen, and Kevin’s different adventures on Earth, to being as many fans of Ben 10’s better days, “a pathetic tribute to the original series.” Not only to the characters, who are now adults, dress and act the same way they did when they were younger, but the show constantly flips between young Ben and adult Ben. This would create a difficult setting to follow if it was not for the events of the future being dependent on the events of the past in the respective episode. But at the same time, the events of Ben’s childhood defy the events of the original show. Ben was supposed to have taken off the Omnitrix at age ten and put it back on after five years. Yet Derrick J. Wyatt, backed by his fantards, wanted to see more of young Ben, even if it meant warping the chronology of the series. And then the explanation for all these contradictions and paradoxes is justified by an episode in which the universe is destroyed, and then recreated according to Ben’s interpretation of it. So not only is the universe deformed, but it is done because of Ben’s flaws, once again catering the fantards who want to see Ben as irresponsible as possible.
The altered universe has dramatically altered the characters. The attempt at creating old-fashioned characters in a modern setting, like in Scooby-Doo Mystery Incorporated, created a deformity to the characters that still strayed from the old feel of Ben 10. Ben, Gwen, and Kevin are reused body frames of Shaggy, Daphne/Velma, and Fred/Optimus Prime, respectively. Ben and Gwen even look and act like Shaggy and Velma in many ways. Ben dresses in green and brown, has an un-tucked shirt, a laid-back attitude, and a similar hairstyle to shaggy. Gwen has gotten much shorter, dresses in a shirt and skirt, and has somehow acquired freckles, both in her young and old incarnations, as well as a need for glasses. Her personality is rather intellectual, as well. Even Grandpa Max purposely looks more like the character he was based on—Captain Marvel—and Derrick J Wyatt admitted to it, and that being the reason for his squinted eyes. Aside from obvious similarities, these new appearances even make the characters look like other people. Now, Kevin resembles Marilyn Mansion, Grandpa Max looks like Mr. Magoo, and Professor Paradox reminds individuals of Reed Richards.On top of that, characters can even be stereotypical at times, especially non-Caucasian characters like Julie Yamamoto, who has pigtails, yellowish skin, and squinted brown eyes.
To sum up, Ben 10 Omniverse attempts to be centered around its own roots, when its development, which still brought it success without straying from the concept of the show, had never changed to begin with. It is as if a literal tree tried to grow downwards to be closer to its roots, and at the same time expect to survive unaided. It fails to realize that it is still connected to its roots, which is the mistake Derrick J. Wyatt made with this show. As for merchandise and profit, newer aliens are constantly being introduced, which either defeat the purpose of older aliens, or do not possess any powers at all. With the lack of seriousness portrayed in this show, it often looks like they are giving the message that actions do not have consequences, and even Vilgax’s constant returns show that.
And the analytics and critics of Derrick J. Wyatt’s work—those of us who want reform for the good of all Ben 10 fans, as well as the reservation of other action programming—are called “a handful of haters” by Derrick J. Wyatt, further proving the point that we are seen as haters when we are really expressing the deep truth.But sadly, fantards assume that Cartoon Network tells them everything, and that every work out of their corrupt mouths is completely true. They even believe they have a say in programming because of the polls and forum of their website; this, however, as expressed by Stuart Snyder’s fan input policy, is insignificant to any production of their programming (unless it helps them identify a way to cater them). Fantards are always calling us the haters, saying we should tolerate their addiction, yet they will not respect our decisions. If they are going to be hypocritical in their own views, we do not have to respect the stupidity and ignorance that form their uneducated, uninformed, and unjustified opinions. A free country especially does not justify stupidity, because with the power of freedom comes the responsibility to do what is best for everyone's interests, and that everybody knows what is good for each other through mutual understanding.
With the ongoing economic recession, Fusionfall’s programming company, Grigon, went bankrupt and defunct; its dying state was likely the reason why this company was initially selected by Stuart Snyder for Fusionfall. The series Level Up served as an excuse for Cartoon Network to not find a new programming company for Fusionfall after Grigon went bankrupt and defunct. Enough evidence regarding production chronology can even lead to a conjecture that this was also meant to eventually prevent the release of Code Lyoko Evolution in the United States. Production of Level up allegedly began around the same time that the fifth season of the Code Lyoko franchise had been announced. Even though Level Up has since ended its run, it was airing new episodes around the same time Moonscoop attempted to get Cartoon Network to dub and air Code Lyoko Evolution in the United States. Even more coincidental is the plot, which not only went into production the same time as Code Lyoko Evolution, but ran a shockingly similar plot of a virtual villain fighting teenage students in the real world. The game "Conqueror of all worlds" has a disturbing resemblance to "World of Warcraft" as well, in terms of concept. Overall, these shows accomplished their goal through different methods; to prevent any forms of Cartoon Network's past from resurfacing, and to fool new-gen fans into thinking they really are the first iconic success and staple to the network. Although Level Up has since been cancelled, this is only because it had served its stated purpose.
The following are a few additional traits that are shared by multiple shows, including ones that suffered the MTV effect. Firstly, the origin of newer programs has caused a decline in actual cartoons. Most of these creators were not working for these networks prior to their ideas for shows, and were either unaware or did not care for the principles that brought older shows success and fame. Unlike newer programs, the Cartoon Cartoons relied on standards of quality animation for success, instead of wheedling fans into falsely enjoying a show only due to escapism or surrealism. Not only that, but most of these programs existed in media elsewhere before, lowering the originality. In fact, most of Nickelodeon’s Nicktoons are television sequels or spin-offs of Dreamworks movies, and very few original works. Some have even been internet sensations that have just been copied for the sake of competing for online ratings. Often, these shows will even be in CGI animation, thus hardly registering as a cartoon. Because of all of these factors, less than half of the programs aired on Cartoon Network are owned and/or produced by them. Even worse is the appearance of drug usage for a show’s influence. Although the intimation of being under the influence of drugs may not have been intended among these show creators, it is not unlike the crime of plagiarism; it is the fact that the act has been committed, in great numbers, and without any justifiable reason whatsoever that stimulates accusations and convictions, whether by accident or on purpose. It gives the impression to viewers that doing drugs is alright if not only their celebrity role models and idols, but also their show creators may be doing it as well.
Another problem with the new programming, particularly on Cartoon Network, is how shockingly similar it is to some of Adult Swim's shows, almost appearing to be kid-friendly counterparts to them.
Adventure time reminds a lot of people of Superjail because of its art style, but Adventure Time’s problems go much farther than similar artistic effects. Firstly, this show first aired a pilot on Nickelodeon that failed. There was no direct reason stated for its failure, but the show’s subliminal appearance of an individual under the effects of LSD is widely accepted for the cause rather than a lack of ratings. After becoming an internet sensation, Cartoon Network picked it up, and allowed the show to become a cash cow once Stuart Snyder returned to power. However, the original purpose of acquiring the show was to attempt the MTV effect on Cartoon Network, especially since the pilot had originally aired on Nickelodeon. Stuart Snyder planned to use this program as the start of the MTV effect on the network, especially since it already had live-action programming and diminishing animated shows, both original and acquired. However, this plan backfired and resulted in his firing, and Adventure time would have become just another cartoon to air on Cartoon Network, while not erasing the network’s true roots. With the return of reruns, Penelton Ward could have seen and learned what his predecessors created and how it was done through honest means. But when Stuart Snyder’s return marked the expelling of almost all of Cartoon Network’s former programming, Adventure Time expanded into a so-called staple to the network, making new-gen fans truly believe that Cartoon Network’s greatness started with Adventure Time. Even Chowder and Flapjack, running shows that were not even receiving poorly in the start of the Check It era, were ended to make more room for Adventure Time.
Not only does the setting made no sense to begin with, but the setting is not explained until much further in the show. It is explained that the land of Ooo is post-apocalyptic earth, and that nuclear wars brought the destruction of mankind. Yet none of that explains the development of inanimate objects suddenly becoming sentient beings, let alone the fate of mankind (which must still exist if Finn is there). Penelton Ward has admitted to having taken inspiration from Candy Land and the Mario games for inspiration, which is the reason for the show’s utter randomness. As we have noted, the surrealism in shows, especially the abundant amount in this program, is the only thing contributing to the entertainment value; at the same time, fantards can only find the show amusing because of their belief in tolerance and conformity. They believe their love for Adventure Time justifies their love for the show by the most unorthodox means, loving it as much a person could be extremist with a religion, if not more. Yet they complain about those who are not bombastic with their interests, foolishly associating it with conformity. Yet they do not understand they are being conformists themselves by tricking their mind into willingly loving and accepting modern programming, with no regard to how the standards of quality may have changed, or even the impact on pop culture.
Fantards are only liking these shows for the immature and ignorant personalities of these shows’ characters, rather than looking deeper into the show. They claim that they can perceive depth through the show’s messages, but these morals and themes are inconsequential conflicts that only cause such a relative struggle because this program lacks role models that act out of logic, reason, and ideals, rather than for personal benefits or social status. Even the show’s main protagonist, Finn, has used lies, deception, and escapism to solve his problems. Even though he has good intentions, he is not limited to resort to such methods, and does so out of laziness, personal tastes, or to work in his favor. Once again, an immoral ideal is shown, fooling fans into thinking that taking the easy way out of a problem is alright. And minor morals introduced in this show, such as Bubblegum’s standing up to Richardio, have only been found deep for being a play on words.
In our movement, we have discovered reason to believe that these children's networks, Cartoon Network in particular, have been using online communities such as deviantART in order to have fans blindly support their shows through the bad character traits that are expressed in their shows. In addition, two aspects of Adventure Time, the lesbian pairing Bubbline and the transgendered universe of Fionna and Cake, were deliberately used to have fetishists and Yuri artists, especially explicit ones, to support the show as well, even if they care more for the fetish than the actual show. The catering of fantards to an extreme extent has also been a cover-up for Cartoon Network’s lack of tolerance for homosexuality. One episode of Dexter’s Laboratory was banned for having a gay person in it, the Silver Spooner, who was hardly a gay stereotype. Yet at the same time, Dukey from Johnny Test does in fact act like a stereotype of a homosexual, and the show indirectly implies that his misfortunes are a result from his actions (of acting gay).
Regular show is a lot like Aqua Teen because of the copied plot format. Often, the plot revolves around the main characters interacting, often acting annoyed or obnoxious towards one another, and believing they are cool for doing so. Even when a show Ed, Edd, ‘n’ Eddy had immature and ignorant characters, they at least had a character to play the voice of reason, which made the show justifiable in the sense that they are not only kids, but that the show is not filled with bad role models alone. Regular Show, however, has no indication of good judgment among any character, which in turn makes everybody learn from their mistakes right as the main conflict—almost always something apocalyptic—occurs, and they are forced to change their ways unwillingly in order to save themselves. While Aqua Teen Hunger Force does not always have a resolved conflict in their episodes, the only reason that Regular Show has a resolution, in addition to the character’s temporary realization of their personal problems, is to appease the adults that had a problem with their earlier programs. But the majority of the stated issues with this show, including the overall appearance of it, have been noted to resemble similar experiences with the brain under the use of cocaine.
The new MAD series is far too much like Robot Chicken. Although MAD came out long before Adult Swim was even launched, Stuart Snyder wanted to air it for the purpose of having a parody-based show like its late-night counterpart. The problem with MAD is that the jokes and gags get old due to excessive use, repeated jokes and attitude, and the use of parodies based on any possible pun they can make out of the title, even ones which spark simple crossovers more than humorous ideas. Overall, the humor in the show is seen as gross, immature, and offensive. To avoid deformation of fictional characters and real people, Robot Chicken says in the intro "Any likeliness of celebrities or actual names are used in a fictuous and parodic manner." MAD, on the other hand, says no warning regarding the accuracy to the people, places, things, and ideas they portray. Not only that, but MAD even makes references to Adult Swim shows like Family guy and King of the Hill. If the targeted audience is supposed to be younger than that of Adult Swim, even with a TV-PG rating, why do they make references to adult shows? It is certainly not to have older audiences go back and realize those shows were present, as it was already easily identifiable to begin with. This is once again an example of a show that attempts to push the censor and associate itself with adult shows and movies, while Cartoon Network can water it down from time to time in order to get away with what many parents complained about.
Gumball is another imitative program. Shockingly similar to Drawn Together, most of the characters are animated and drawn differently. The creator of the show’s intent was to have other people create their own characters and stories out of rejected characters that had been created for commercials, and unify them under a school setting. Not only were these characters essentially unchanged, but the setting is rather similar to Doug; young adolescents facing everyday life, but at the same time the ideas for episodes are either too trivial, or make no sense at all due to lack of a uniform setting created by the overly-diverse characters. While a variety of characters might sound like a good thing, there is no logical explanation in the show as to why none of the characters are similar, and the only way to enjoy this show is to ignore this issue in spite of its primary presence. But in addition, the show itself hardly qualifies as a real cartoon to begin with. Aside from lacking quality standards, it is done entirely by flash and with live-action backgrounds.
As opinionated as quality animation may sound, this IS a concrete explanation of quality and how it ceased to exist. Peter Cullen once said in a Toonami promo that “Quality speaks for itself.” And it truly does. While it is thought that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, that adage describes a different type of quality standards. In these networks, there are two types of quality standards; general appeal and individual appeal.
General appeal is the standards that which we preach, which have numerous varying factors, not all of which have been completely identified. These aspects include certain balances, such as originality versus imitative and light mood versus dark mood. Other non-contradictory aspects should be present, no matter what; if two of such cannot coexist in a program due to being the opposite of one another, then one of them does not belong.
One particular example is genre. Too often, kids’ action shows are filled in by an overly-light mood or uncalled for humor. It ultimately gives the innuendo that the heroes are actually fighting a bully who has no evil intent, and the heroes only try to stop him for the sake of bringing him down. Sometimes, there may not be an evil motivation behind the villain, and the cliché of evil laughter is often used. In fact, this makes the heroes appear to be more like the bully than the hero himself. The main cause of this in dubbed non-American animation is censorship.
Another factor is the intent of the show. One must consider why a network might want to create a certain show or type of show. For example, think of shows that were made only to push the MTV effect forward. The problem with that is that when these networks focus solely on only a few new aspects they intend to alter, they do not consider how it will affect the quality of the rest of it, not unlike how the purpose of Toonami’s TOM 4 era was focused on giving TOM a face and making him look more realistic.
Petition continued here; http://fusion-bioformer[dot]tumblr[dot]com/post/46190481861/petition-continued-from-change-org
h***@yahoo.com
2013-12-22 18:53:57 UTC
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Hole In The Wall WAS NOT a CN original. It was a series acquired from Fox.

J. C. Gilbert

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